World’s Most Unusual Beaches

Ethereal and otherworldly, these beaches are not your typical ‘white sand and palm trees’

Published: 20 June 2018, Text by: Eris Choo

It’s summertime and you know what that means - a trip to the beach is in order!

While most people would think of white sand, turquoise blue waters and swaying palm trees, there are plenty of unusual beaches around the world that would make for an unforgettable experience.

Pink Sand Beaches, Indonesia

Photo: Banhfrend, Wikimedia
Photo: Banhfrend, Wikimedia

There are only a handful of pink beaches around the world, and Indonesia is home to two: Pink Beach in Komodo Island, Flores, and Tangsi Beach in Lombok. The colouration comes from red coral in the shallow waters mixed into grains of sand, and the soft, pastel pink provides beautiful contrast with the crystal clear, turquoise waters surrounding the beaches. Go only if you’re keen on taking that perfect shot for Instagram or looking to catch the sunset, as water sports are not allowed in the area.

Photo: Wei Hung He, Flickr
Photo: Wei Hung He, Flickr

Planktons Beach, Maldives

Night visitors to Planktons Beach in the Maldives, might sometimes be treated to a magical, almost otherworldly sight, when the ocean is turned into a ‘sea of stars’. Millions of bioluminescent plankton give off a bright, blue glow as the waves hit the shore, or when feet step onto wet sand. The beach is just one of several other places within the island chain where visitors can go to witness this incredible phenomenon.

Beach of the Cathedrals, Spain

Photo: Pexels
Photo: Pexels

The full magnificence of Praia das Catedrais beach, also known as Beach of the Cathedrals, can only be appreciated during low tide, when it reveals its yawning caves and majestic arch-like formations. Resembling soaring buttresses, these arches are sometimes 30 metres high and were painstakingly carved over millennia by the power of wind and sea.

Glass Beach, California

Photo: Moximox, Wikimedia
Photo: Moximox, Wikimedia

Glass Beach in Fort Bragg is a reminder of the damage mankind can inflict on Mother Nature, but also her resilience in the face of adversity. The area was once a dumping site for residents for over six decades, before the city council finally closed it off in 1967. Since then, cleanup programmes have been initiated to clear the sites of metal and garbage. Broken glass and pottery, worn smooth by the pounding waves, eventually washed up ashore, creating a blanket of colourful pieces. Take nothing home but memories and pictures, as it is illegal to remove any pieces from the beach.

Photo: Tourism Northern Ireland
Photo: Tourism Northern Ireland

Giants Causeway, Ireland

Located on the coast of Northern Ireland, it’s easy to see why this natural wonder has been shrouded in mystery and legend for hundreds of years. First discovered in 1692, the 40,000 basalt columns tower as high as 12 metres, before disappearing into the sea. Most of these columns are precisely ‘cut’ into interlocking hexagonal shapes, although they might have anywhere from four to eight sides. Today we know that they were formed 60 million years ago from a volcanic eruption, but the phenomena was so unusual for those living in the 17th century that arguments were put forward that the causeway was man made by an ancient civilisation, or created by a giant.

Photo Credits: Maldives, Indonesia, California, Ireland 


 

© 2018 Malaysia Airlines Berhad (1116944-X)
Powered by Spafax