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The first semester school holidays for 2019 are here! While malls and theme parks will be packed with families looking to spend quality time together, there are plenty of other places and attractions in Malaysia with something for both the young and old. We’ve listed seven to help you plan your trip.

Credit: Tourism Malaysia

KL Bird Park

A tropical escape in the heart of Kuala Lumpur, KL Bird Park is one of the world’s largest covered bird parks, and is home to over 3,000 birds from more than 200 species. Divided into four sections, the park is a good place to get up close to birds such as cockatiels, flamingoes, bulbuls, peacocks, hornbills and more.

Credit: Tourism Malaysia

Aside from observing the birds in their natural habitats, there is also an educational gallery and an incubation station to see where chicks are hatched, as well as a feeding station where one can hand feed flightless birds. Come during the bird show slots to see various types of birds in action at the park’s Amphitheatre.

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Taiping Zoo & Night Safari

The oldest zoo in Malaysia is still well maintained, welcoming guests with lush landscapes and over 1,200 animals from 140 species. Much of the zoo has been designed to integrate with the original landscape, so visitors will find small streams, lakes and gentle hills incorporated into the layout. Some of the zoo’s star residents include Asian elephants, tigers, tapirs, giraffes and zebras. Meanwhile, the Night Safari offers visitors the chance to see nocturnal animals in their habitats after dark.

Credit: Tourism Malaysia
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Pantai Cahaya Bulan

Pantai Cahaya Bulan in the state of Kelantan is a popular recreational spot for locals and tourists alike, where one can engage in fun water sports and other activities, such as kite flying, horse riding, picnicking and watching the sunset. The 1.2 kilometre stretch of sandy beach boasts azure blue waters, and has various facilities such as chalets, souvenir shops and food stalls.

Credit: Tourism Malaysia

Kidzania

What do you want to be when you grow up?  Kidzania in Bandar Utama, Petaling Jaya lets your children explore this rhetorical question through immersive experiences – by allowing them to ‘roleplay’ various jobs, whether as a firefighter, a doctor, a pilot or a journalist. Choose from over 100 exciting careers in their scaled indoor city, complete with its own Hospital, Police and Fire Station, Supermarket, Beauty Salon and Theatre. Children can also learn the fundamentals of economics and monetary management through experiential play, such as earning in-house currencies through employment, trade and investment.

Credit: Tourism Malaysia

Gua Kelam

Those craving a more adventurous family excursion can opt for a visit to Gua Kelam, a 370-metre-long limestone cave in Perlis. The cave walk leads visitors through a brightly lit wooden walkway and past remnants of a tin mine operation within the cave before emerging at the other side. Along the way, admire the beautiful natural formations and look out for roosting bats and other cave creatures.

Credit: Tourism Malaysia

Sepilok Orang Utan Rehabilitation Centre

The Sepilok Orang Utan Rehabilitation centre in Sabah is a good place to expose children to the importance of environmental and wildlife conservation. Built to help rehabilitate orphaned orangutans, the centre is located within a mixed dipterocarp forest – the natural habitat of orangutans. Visitors can make their way through an elevated boardwalk that takes them through lush vegetation to a viewing platform, where orangutans are fed twice daily. A visitor centre offers more insights into the organisation’s work, as well as information on the animals and their plight.

Cat Museum

Dedicated to all things feline, the unique cat museum in Kuching, Sarawak has over 4,000 artefacts relating to cats, from paintings and sculptures to dolls and statues. Some of the highlights include a mummified cat from ancient Egypt and taxidermic models of Bornean wild cats. Visitors will also learn about how different cultures around the world view cats, such as the Maneki Neko from Japan, where cats are considered lucky animals.